Hineleban Cafe

In this day and age, food and advocacy easily go hand in hand, as seen by drives such as “Restaurants Against Hunger” with different restaurants having special menus and donations for the refugees of Syria. Some establishments go a step further than advocacy by incorporating their causes in their everyday work, be it in their menus or in-house shops. An up and coming exemplar of this is the Hineleban Cafe, located near one of Makati City’s busiest districts.

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The word Hineleban is an indigenous term referring to the “Mother Tree” at the heart of a rainforest. The Hineleban Cafe is one of several projects of the Hineleban Foundation, which is dedicated to reforestation and empowering the Philippines’ indigenous peoples to take back their roles as custodians of the environment. The cafe is a venue for showcasing and marketing goods from the foundation’s research and development farm, the Tuminugan Farm in Bukidnon, Mindanao.

Much praise has been heaped on Hineleban Cafe for its coffee (which has helped make it a spot for gatherings and events). However, we at Team Glasses have long sworn off this brown gold for health reasons, so what could draw us to this cafe? The answer: adlai. Adlai (Coix lacryma-jobi) is a grain that is native to Southeast Asia. In the USA it is called “Job’s Tears” or Chinese Pearl Barley. It has been cultivated for both sustenance and medicinal purposes by different tribes in Zamboanga del Sur and other parts of Southern Philippines. In more recent years, adlai has been touted as a supplement or alternative to rice, owing partly for its health benefits as well as its acceptability to diners more used to rice, especially well milled white rice.

At Hineleban Cafe, dishes that would normally be served with a cupful of rice or a bowlful of pasta are instead graced with a generous serving of adlai.

 

We decided to have our adlai in two ways during our visit to Hineleban Cafe. We went with one of the all day breakfast meals: longganisa hubad served with egg and adlai, and with another more innovative idea which was longganisa bolognese, which was adlai cooked with a sausage and tomato ragout. To wash this all down we had hot chocolate and a cup of red berries caffeine free tea.

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A most creative tea strainer

The longganisa hubad plate was a good balance of flavors, with the starchiness of the adlai complementing well with the salty and garlicky mix from the longanisa. The salted egg salsa also added a subtle kick to the dish, which would be something we can suggest for anyone to start their morning with. Only nitpick here would be the oiliness, but that’s really the nature of the beast when it comes to longganisa.

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Not rice. That’s adlai for you

As we discovered, adlai makes a very interesting alternative to pasta, owing to its chewy texture. It is reminiscent of eating a plate of orzo, or Italian pasta shaped like a large grain of rice. However, adlai has a lighter flavor and a rather different mouth feel. When mixed with a ragout, such as in the case of the longganisa bolognese, one can have a delicious and very filling meal in a bowl. The ragout itself could have used a little bit of a kick, owing to its mild flavor, but we admit that this is a matter of personal preference.

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Adlai with a sausage ragout, Pinoy style!

For those who are not fans of adlai, Hineleban Cafe also serves dishes made with bread, and of course its selection of exquisite brewed coffees. What makes this cafe a must for future adventures is its way of bringing forward an often forgotten advocacy, which is that of furthering the role of indigenous peoples in protecting the environment. In this world today, we need voices to help each other speak out and promote new, sustainable ways of living. Thankfully, the Hineleban Foundation and the Hineleban Cafe are among them.

 

Food Score: 4/5: All things considered, such as getting used to the taste of adlai, Hineleban Cafe does a great job of integrating this grain with cafe favorites such as breakfast meals and pastas.

Ambiance Score: 4/5: Hineleban Cafe shares a space with a bike and surf shop, thus giving the surrounding area a busy, almost utilitarian feel. However the cafe itself makes good by making their space seem like a cushy urban loft. The selection of books in its reading nook are a great help too.

Service Score: 4/5: We arrived here on a quiet Saturday morning, and the place had only a few staff on hand. While we were very well served with much courtesy, we do hope that the service is able to keep up during peak hours like the dinner rush.

GERD Score: 4.5/5: Hineleban Cafe and its adlai are something worth trying, since there are plenty of menu options for people dealing with GERD. Also this is a good place for a spot of tea as well. Definitely worth a visit.

Neurodivergent Score: 4.5/5: All hail adlai for being gluten free! That alone is a great relief to some neurodivergents. The caffeine free tea is also worth a try here, and an option for those wanting hot drinks while their companions sip the coffee that Hineleban Cafe is known for.

Team Glasses Score: 4.5/5: Hineleban Cafe is more than just another “third wave” cafe or trendy yuppie spot; it’s really a cafe with a mission. And providing a reliable source of adlai to this city is a plus too. We hope that more people will visit this cafe and learn about its advocacy in the coming years!

Hineleban Cafe Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

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‘Sup with Sorghum?

During one of our recent forays into a food exhibition we passed by, we tried out what appeared initially to be popcorn. However, something about its texture was lighter than what we expected, leading us to inquire a little further.

 

We were proudly told by the exhibitioner that what we had was not corn at all, but Sorghum.

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Sor….what? Was this another up and coming healthy food trend? Not exactly. We learned that sorghum has been around a lot longer than we thought. The plant known as sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) has been cultivated for thousands of years as a staple in parts of the continent of Africa as well as in the subcontinent of India. It is a hardy plant that can withstand dry and harsh conditions, and has been said to be able to take root even with less cultivated soils. Several varieties of sorghum are used not only as bases for breads and porridges, but even as sweeteners.

 

In recent years, sorghum has caught the attention of health conscious foodies, thanks to its nutrition density. A 100 gram serving of sorghum delivers around 339 to 355 kilocalories, which is a little less than the calories present in a similar sized serving of quinoa. Sorghum also packs more protein, iron, and dietary fiber than other staple foods such as rice. This makes sorghum appealing to those intending to go on a diet limiting simple carbohydrates. Another attractive quality of sorghum is the fact that it is gluten free, making this a great choice for those with gluten hypersensitivities or allergies.

 

How does one cook sorghum? Grainhouse provides two suggestions for cooking sorghum. It can be boiled just like rice until it is soft, or it can be popped just like corn. Sorghum’s mild flavor lends itself well to being combined with flavorful sauces and meats for an entree, or with salt and spices as a popped snack. More adventurous gourmands may want to try out traditional recipes from India or northeastern African, using sorghum to make porridge or couscous.

 

At present, sorghum is not widely available in the Philippines. However it is being cultivated by small scale growers in Ilocos Norte, as part of initiatives to provide alternative grain sources as well as livelihood for communities. This is exactly what Wholly Grain by Grainhouse is doing right now.

 

In case you’re looking for something different from the usual popcorn, or are simply health conscious, sorghum would be a great healthy alternative to consider. We hope to see this crop find a place in our local culinary repertoire.

 

Feeding Manila in Peace and War, 1850-1945 (a book review)

What makes a city? It is more than just the mortar and stone in its buildings, or even the very people populating it. A key aspect of a metropolis is its supply lines for food and resources, which is the very thesis of Daniel F. Doeppers’ book, Feeding Manila in Peace and War, 1850-1945.

 

Doeppers, a professor of Southeast Asian studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has retold some of the most intriguing chapters of Manila’s history in terms of how its inhabitants regularly (or not so regularly) ate, drank, and sourced their basic needs from nearby provinces. The book goes into interesting details ranging from how the waterways of Bulacan and Malabon were changed to accommodate the rice trade, all the way to the rise of the popularity of chocolate as a beverage, and how it was displaced by coffee. Everything from animal and human diseases, fishing practices, and the potable water supply makes its way into the text.

Apart from these bits of trivia, Doeppers’ text also documents the rise of families and companies involved in the food industry, many of which are still big players in commerce to this day.

 

Although lengthy and at times tedious with its emphasis on economic trends and statistics, Feeding Manila in Peace and War, 1850-1945 provides a fresh look into life in the city of Manila, especially for the denizens who hardly get a mention in textbooks. One gets a vivid sense of the ingenuity, tenacity and good humor characterizing the residents of this old city, all the way up to the devastation that befell it during the Second World War. It reminds people that much of human history is associated with the realities of existence such as feast and famine, all of which go on despite upheavals and grand events.

 

This book is a recommended read not only for anthropologists and scholars of Philippine History, but even for foodies and culinary enthusiasts. It is well thought out and spaced under easy to follow subject headings, making it suitable for earnest study as well as casual reading. Since we at Team Glasses Food Blog are not only foodies but also history geeks, this book was a particular treat.

 

Feeding Manila in Peace and War, 1850-1945 is available from the Ateneo de Manila University Press at Bellarmine Hall, Katipunan Avenue. More details may be found at www.ateneopress.org.

(featured image from wikipedia)

Honey Nutribar: The Future Disaster-Relief Snack

In a country where natural disasters happen often, food that’s both filling and nutritious is a necessity. Unfortunately, most relief packs from donations consist of either crackers and biscuits, canned goods, or things like noodles or rice which require potable water. The last two options have downsides to them, which are the problem of artificially made preservatives, as well as the lack of sustainable potable water or water-filtration systems in evacuation centers and in ground zero.

If my guilty pleasure of watching people who eat military or civilian Meals Ready to Eat (MRE) has taught me anything, ready to eat foods need to meet certain criteria.  Since its purpose is to be ready to eat even after a year of storage or more, an MRE pack should remain edible despite being stored  for a long period of time. It should be easy to transport without crumbling apart readily. And most importantly, these should have a healthy amount of calories and nutrients to make one survive the grueling day or have a substantial meal in a pinch.

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While we don’t have locally-produced MRE packs like in the US or Indonesia, I would have to say that the Honey Nutribar is a step in the right direction.

Created by the Department of Science and Technology – Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI), the Honey NutriBar is made out of pinipig (pounded glutinous rice), honey, rice krispies, dried fruits, and pectin. What sets this bar apart from the commercially available ones is the process that’s involved in preserving it.

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Each bar is vacuum-sealed in laminated aluminum foil, and then irradiated at a dose of 1 kilogray gamma radiation at the PNRI’s Multipurpose Irradiation Facility. Now one asks him or herself, “Irradiated? Isn’t that toxic?”. Unlike what happens in nuclear meltdown and accidents like Chernobyl or Fukushima, the irradiation process does not turn the food radioactive, and in fact makes it safer for consumption.

Now what is irradiation exactly? It is the process wherein the food (in this case, the Honey NutriBar) is exposed to electron beams or gamma radiation. Here are some benefits to the irradiation process.

  1. Preservation by destroying or deactivating the organisms that speed up spoilage and decomposition.
  2. Elimination of disease-causing bacteria such as Salmonella and E.Coli.
  3. Sterilization. Sterilized food last long in storage and a useful source of food for patients with severely-impaired immune systems.
  4. Irradiating does not change the taste or consistency of food.

Currently, the said product is still in development. The team at PNRI has managed to get the Honey Nutribar’s shelf life at nine months, but the staff in the PNRI conference area told us that the team is aiming to make it shelf-stable for two years.

With a bit of help from individuals and groups willing to invest in this research, the Honey Nutribar will soon be able to provide a readily available and tasty source of food during natural disasters and other emergencies. Since these are packed with nutrients and sufficient calories, these snack bars are also great for athletic events and outdoor activities.

 

For more information on the Honey Nutribar, please contact:

Ms. Zenaida M. De Guzman

Head, Biomedical Research Section, Atomic Research Division

Department of Science and Technology – Philippine Nuclear Research Institute

Commonwealth Avenue, Diliman, Quezon City

Tel. No. 929-6010 to 19 loc. 273

Email: zmedguzman@pnri.dost.gov.ph